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We’ve got two new brilliant resources on Aquaculture and Fishing

Roots & Shoots is delighted to announce that we’ve just added two brand new resources to our amazing collection. As with the other resources, these are free to download and use, and have been designed for educators and group leaders to help young people explore, discover and discuss elements of our environment, the challenges our planet faces, what we can do about it – and more importantly empower young people to take action.

Aquaculture

Our first new resource is all about aquaculture. Most people are familiar with the term agriculture, which is farming on land, but not all young people will have heard of its water-based equivalent, aquaculture.

Just like agriculture, the environmental impact of aquaculture varies depending on which species are being farmed, where the farming is located, and the methods used.

In this free activity, young people will compare and contrast the environmental impact of different types of aquaculture, and brainstorm ways they can make a difference.

Commercial Fishing

Fish from the sea is food for people all around the planet, and it also provides jobs, is the heart of some communities, and is the root of an entire industry. In fact, it’s estimated that around 260 million people worldwide are supported by marine fishing.

But like any other industry, there are negative aspects to some parts of it, and there’s always ways it could become more environmentally friendly and sustainable. This resource examines the fishing industry and suggests choices that consumers can take to help steer it into more sustainable practices.

As part of this activity, young people will learn about the jobs supported by the fishing industry around the world, and about some of the problems of commercial fishing. They’ll discover ways it can be made more sustainable, and the important concept of consumer pressure.

And they’ll take direct action themselves, surveying fish at a local supermarket and writing to them to ask about their fish sourcing policies.

 

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